Everest Base Camp Trek : Challenge List - Kevin Creusy on 06/02/2013

If you want to learn more about this trek you’ll have to check it in my guide, but here is a Top 5 of the most difficult things trekking to EBC.

photo Everest Base Camp Trek : Challenge List
I just come back from a trip to Nepal, this close neighbor of India and China. Since I will be writing my own travel guide pretty soon I will not tell you all about this great trip. Just a quick post about one of the biggest challenges in my life: Everest Base Camp (EBC) Trek.
I consider myself physically active (I am quite the runner), but nothing could have prepared me for this trip.
If you want to learn more about this trek you’ll have to check it in my guide, but here is a Top 5 of the most difficult things trekking to EBC.

5) Hygiene

While everybody say they’ll keep showering on a daily basis no matter what, trust me the -5°c in your bedroom and the impossibility to get hot water will be solid arguments against this occidental habit…

4) Bags

Well, you’ll say I deserve this one, but having a 15 kg bag on my shoulders probably didn’t help. You get used to it at some point, it makes the beginning of the journey exhausting though.

3) The food

Local food is great when you visit a country. That’s 100% true. Trust me, after 5hrs/day of walk you wouldn’t say no to the proteins contained in a burger. The local meal, the “Dal Bhat”, fills you up but won’t help your sore muscles to grow back.

2) Altitude

I am not only talking about your heart beating at running pace when you lift of a spoon, but also about the long and restless nights above 4800m (15,800 feet). Indeed it really doesn’t matter that your body is on the verge of death itself, you simply can’t close your eyes and rest. Good luck with that.

1) Coldness

Nothing seems cold anymore since I came back. If some of you have ever skied and think they know what -10°c is like, let me point out that when you stop skiing you can go back to your warm home and take a hot chocolate. During this trek, your home is about -5°c, this means that you share your sleeping bag with your water, your camera and your new set of clothes for them not to freeze. Not being hot in 10 days is a feeling I really don’t look forward to. Great experience though!